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Lupita Nyong’o Exposes That Michael Jackson Was The Inspiration For 12 Years A Slave Role : worldleaks

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Lupita Nyong’o seems to be a big fan of Michael Jackson, as the Oscar nominated actress has included that she used Michael Jackson as an inspiration for her character in 12 Years a Slave.

The Kenyan actress has exposed that she felt her character had similar qualities to that of Michael Jackson.

In an interview with Dazed and Confused magazine, she spoke about how she modeled her character’s doings after Michael Jackson’s child-like qualities.

“There’s something very Michael Jackson-like about Patsey – the child-like quality he always had,” she explained. “She had her childhood stripped away from her of a sudden as soon as she became of sexual age.”

Lupita acted the role Patsey in the Golden Globe winning movie 12 Years a Slave. She is also nominated for Best Actress In A Supporting Role at the upcoming Academy Awards.

She seems to be following in the footsteps of actress Whoopi Goldberg, who was also nominated for an Academy Award for The Color Purple.

Lupita also took that Whoopi Goldberg is one of her inspirations as well.

“Whoopi Goldberg looked like me, she had hair like mine, she was dark like me,” she exposed. “I’d been starved for images of myself. I’d grown up watching a lot of American TV. There was very little Kenyan material, because we had an autocratic ruler who suppressed our creative expression.”

12 Years a Slave is up for nine awards at this year’s show. The Academy Awards will air on ABC on March 2.

 

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Five things we learned from Oscar nominations : worldleaks

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The nominations for the Academy Awards were awarded Thursday morning, and as always there were trends and surprises. Here are a few things we learned:

1. Make way for older women.

It’s not for nothing that one of best jokes from Tina Fey and Amy Poehler at the Golden Globes looked up to the lack of meaty roles for actresses of a certain age: “Meryl Streep (is) so brilliant in ‘August: Osage County,’ proving that there are still great parts in Hollywood for Meryl Streeps over 60,” said Fey. And yes, Streep was nominated for an Oscar (for best actress) as well.

But also nominated were Judi Dench, 79, and may be more surprisingly, June Squibb, 84. Squibb is a longtime character actress — you may remember her as Elderly Woman in “Far From Heaven” or Mrs. Cone in an episode of “Curb Your Enthusiasm” — who got a chance to shine as Bruce Dern’s aggravated yet caring wife in “Nebraska.” In fact, of the 10 actresses nominated for either best actress or best supporting actress, six are over 40 and two others — Amy Adams and Sally Hawkins — are in their late 30s.

2. Diversity, but no diversity.

This year had a number of notable movies starring or directed by people of color, admitting “Lee Daniels’ The Butler,” “Fruitvale Station,” “42,” “Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom” and “12 Years a Slave.” But of that group, only “12 Years” got any support from the Oscars, with nine nominations. “Mandela” picked up a nod for a U2 song; “Fruitvale” — despite showcasing rising talents Michael B. Jordan and director Ryan Coogler — got nothing. And despite a $100 million box office — and raves for performers Forest Whitaker and Oprah Winfrey — “The Butler” also came up with zero. During the Globes show, there was a Twitter hashtag protesting the lack of diversity: #notbuyingit. You’ll likely see it again on Oscar night.

3. Where’s Tom Hanks? What about Oprah?

Tom Hanks is one of the most beloved film stars in Hollywood. He’s a successful producer and two-time Oscar winner. After a sluggish few years, marked by “Cloud Atlas,” “Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close” and “Larry Crowne,” he was back in the good graces at the box office and with judges, thanks to “Captain Phillips” and “Saving Mr. Banks.” The result? No Oscar nominations. Maybe he split the vote; maybe voters just weren’t that impressed. (They certainly weren’t by “Mr. Banks.”)

As for Winfrey — also a successful producer and personality — the theory is that “The Butler’s” summer free hurt its chances. But it was still a surprise that her name wasn’t listed for either the Oscars or the Golden Globes. Better luck at the Screen Actors Guild Awards, Oprah.

4. There are no sure things.

The handicappers were wrong about a lot. Take a gander:

Snubbed: Robert Redford, “All Is Lost.” An almost wordless solo performance goes for naught at the Oscars. “Lost,” indeed.
Snubbed: The Coen brothers, “Inside Llewyn Davis.” Despite their offbeat production, Ethan and Joel have become Oscar favorites — even if it’s just a scriptwriting nod. Not this year. Llewyn Davis will have to keep walking the streets.
Snubbed: Emma Thompson, “Saving Mr. Banks.” So much for “Banks” despite its Disney pedigree.
Snubbed: James Gandolfini, “Enough Said.” The academy thought “Enough” was evidently too much, since neither Julia Louis-Dreyfus nor Nicole Holofcener’s script were picked, either.
Surprise!: Sally Hawkins, “Blue Jasmine.” The academy loves Woody Allen screenplays (he got nominated, too), and Hawkins wasn’t missed.
Surprise!: “Philomena.” A small, character-driven movie about a woman searching for her son? Best picture, best actress (Dench) and best adjusted screenplay nominations are the prizes.

5. Love for “Dallas Buyers Club.”

Perhaps “Hustle,” “12 Years” and “Gravity” will duke it out for best picture. But think “no sure things,” because when it came to audience response at the nominations, “Dallas Buyers Club” was the clear winner, greeted with cheers for every nomination. It has an Oscar-friendly subject — a heroic battle against AIDS — and strong performances by Matthew McConaughey and Jared Leto. It found a surprising six nominations.

The Academy Awards are March 2.

 

For more articles : www.worldleaks.com

 

Peter O’Toole, star of Lawrence of Arabia, dies aged 81 : worldleaks

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Actor who shot to fame in David Lean’s 1962 masterpiece and received eight Oscar nominations has died in hospital in London
The actor Peter O’Toole who found stardom in David Lean’s masterpiece Lawrence of Arabia, has died aged 81, his family has annouced.

The acclaimed leading man who overcame stomach cancer in the 1970s passed away at the Wellington hospital in London following a long illness.

His daughter Kate O’Toole said: “His family are very grateful and completely overwhelmed by the outpouring of real love and affection being showed towards him, and to us, during this unhappy time. Thank you all, from the bottom of our hearts.”

O’Toole announced last year he was stopping acting saying: “I bid the profession a dry-eyed and profoundly grateful farewell.”

He said his career on stage and screen fulfilled him emotionally and financially, bringing him together “with fine people, good companions with whom I’ve shared the inevitable lot of all actors: flops and hits.”

The president of Ireland, Michael Higgins, was among the first to pay tribute: “Ireland, and the world, has lost one of the giants of film and theatre.”

“In a long list of leading characters on stage and in film, Peter brought an extraordinary standard to bear as an actor,” Higgins said. “He had a rich interest in literature and a love of Shakespearean sonnets in particular. While he was nominated as best actor for an Oscar eight times, and received a special Oscar from his peers for his contribution to film, he was deeply committed to the stage. Those who saw him play leading roles on the screen from Lawrence in 1962, or through the role of Henry II in Becket, and The Lion in Winter, or through the dozens of films, will recognise a lifetime devoted to the artform of the camera.

Higgins, who knew O’Toole as a friend since 1969, said “all of us who knew him in the west will miss his warm humour and generous friendship.

“He was unsurpassed for the grace he brought to every performance on and off the stage,” he said.

The British prime minister, David Cameron, paid tribute to the actor, saying that Lawrence of Arabia, his favourite film, was “stunning”.

O’Toole‘s agent, Steve Kenis, said: “He was one of a kind in the very best sense and a giant in his field.”

The O’Toole family announced there will be “a memorial filled with song and good cheer, as he would have wished”, but until then they would like to be allowed to grieve privately.

Early in his career O’Toole became emblematic of a new breed of hard-drinking Hollywood hellraiser.

“We heralded the ’60s,” he once said. “Me, [Richard] Burton, Richard Harris; we did in public what everyone else did in private then, and does for show now. We drank in public, we knew about pot.”

In the 1990s he found stage fame starring in Keith Waterhouse’s play, Jeffrey Bernard is Unwell, about a hard-drinking journalist who propped up bars in Soho. O’Toole‘s version sold out the Old Vic theatre in 1999.

Last month it was reported he had been coaxed out of retirement to act in a film about ancient Rome called Katherine of Alexandria in which he would play Cornelius Gallus, a palace orator. It is conceived he completed filming on the project alongside Joss Ackland, Steven Berkoff and Edward Fox and the movie is due to be released next year.

O’Toole is believed to have been born in Connemara in County Galway in Ireland, and lived in London. He shot to stardom in the 1962 film of TE Lawrence’s life story and went on to take leading roles in Goodbye Mr Chips, The Ruling Class, The Stunt Man and My Favourite Year. He received an honorary Oscar in 2003 after receiving eight nominations and no wins – an unassailed record. He considered turning it down and asking the Academy to hold off until he was 80, on the basis that “I am still in the game and might win the bugger outright.”

He finally accepted, saying: “Always a bridesmaid, never a bride, my foot”.

He is lived by his two daughters, Pat and Kate O’Toole, from his marriage to actress Siân Phillips, and his son, Lorcan O’Toole, by Karen Brown.

 

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